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Publications  

Publications (10)

12 Dec
Published in Publications

Adrift Fortunes: Painful Testimonies and MDR - Adrift Fortunes - Oil and Tears

Oil pollution in the Niger Delta is widespread and its impact on the total environment is well documented. However, impact of oil pollution on women in the Niger Delta is grossly understudied and poorly documented. Yet, Women are more exposed to environmental changes because of a number of cultural and socio-economic factors such as keen dependence on natural resources, land right exclusion and patriarchal dominance in decision-making. They bear the burden of caring for families and depend mostly on the natural environment for livelihoods. The primary sources of livelihood of women in the Niger Delta include fishing, gathering of seafood,…
Communities' Perceptions of the Ogoni Clean-up Project
28 Sep
Published in Publications

Communities' Perceptions of the Ogoni Clean-up Project

Oil pollution is widespread in the Niger Delta and is caused by a combination of poor maintenance, corrosion, faulty equipment, failed clean-up attempts, ‘bunkering’ (i.e. large-scale illegal tapping of oil from pipelines) as well as ‘artisanal refining’ (i.e. small-scale, illegal refining of oil). In June 2016, the Federal Government of Nigeria officially launched the Ogoni clean-up process to implement the recommendations of a detailed environmental assessment by the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) published in 2011, to restore livelihood and the environment. Subsequently, in 2017, the Government established and mandated the Hydrocarbon Pollution Remediation Project (HYPREP) to oversee the clean-up…
21 Sep
Published in Publications

CLEAN IT UP report: Shell’s false claims about oil spill response in the Niger Delta

Every year there are hundreds of oil spills in the Niger Delta, caused by old and poorly maintained pipelines or criminal activity such as oil theft. These spills have a devastating impact on the fields, forests and fisheries that the majority of the people in the region depend on for their food and livelihoods. Oil spills also contaminate drinking water and expose people to serious health risks. Preventing oil spills must be a priority, but once they occur, swift and effective clean-up and rehabilitation of pollution and environmental damage is critical to the protection of human rights. If pollution and …
21 Sep
Published in Publications

ANOTHER BODO OIL-Another Flawed Oil Spill Investigation In The Niger Delta

This briefing paper focuses on the investigation into the cause and extent of the June 2012 Bodo oil spill. Oil spill investigations in the Niger Delta have been repeatedly criticized because they are controlled by the oil companies, because they lack transparency and because systemic flaws in the process have never been addressed. The oil spill investigation at Bodo highlights several of the systemic challenges and the impact on the human rights of affected communities. You can download the report through the link below:
Counting the Cost: Corporations and human rights abuses in the Niger Delta
21 Sep
Published in Publications

Counting the Cost: Corporations and human rights abuses in the Niger Delta

Counting the Cost: Corporations and human rights abuses in the Niger Delta. You can download the report through the link below:
21 Sep
Published in Publications

THE TRUE TRAGEDY - Delays and failures in tackling oil spills in the Niger delta

‘‘In August and December 2008, two major oil spills disrupted the lives of the 69,000 or so people living in Bodo, a town in Ogoniland in the Niger Delta. Both spills continued for weeks before they were stopped. Estimates suggest that the volume of oil spilled was as large as the Exxon Valdez spill in Alaska in 1989.1 Three years on, the prolonged failure of the Shell Petroleum Development Company of Nigeria (Shell), a subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell, to clean up the oil that was spilled, continues to have catastrophic consequences for the Bodo community. As the photographs in…
Bad Information: Oil Spill Investigations in the Niger Delta – Amnesty International
03 Sep
Published in Publications

Bad Information: Oil Spill Investigations in the Niger Delta – Amnesty International

Hundreds of oil spills occur in Nigeria every year, causing significant harm to the environment, destroying local livelihoods and placing human health at serious risk. 1. These spills are caused by corrosion, poor maintenance of oil infrastructure, equipment failure, sabotage and theft of oil. For the last decade oil companies in Nigeria – in particular Shell – have defended the scale of pollution by claiming that the vast majority of oil spills are caused by sabotage and theft of oil. 2. There is no legitimate basis for this claim. It relies on the outcome of an oil spill investigation process…
No Progress
03 Sep
Published in Publications

No Progress

Three years after the publication of a groundbreaking report by the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) on oil pollution in Ogoniland, the people of Ogoniland continue to suffer the effects of fifty years of an oil industry which has polluted their land, air and water. The oil company Shell and the Nigerian Government have both failed to implement recommendations made in the UNEP report and put an end to the abuse of the communities’ rights to food, water and a life free of pollution. This briefing details how both the government and Shell have failed to ensure adequate provision of emergency…
Polluted Promises
03 Sep
Published in Publications

Polluted Promises

Shell is responsible for a toxic legacy in the Niger Delta. People are dying, sick, can’t feed themselves and have no clean water because Shell destroyed their environment by drilling for oil. UNEP researched the destruction, publishing a report in 2011. The report concluded that Shell had not taken sufficient action to clean up and set out initial steps to rectify the damage. Platform’s research in Ogoniland shows that Shell has still not cleaned-up, almost 3 years after the UNEP report was published. Platform witnessed polluted creeks and soil reeking of oil, in areas that Shell claims to have remediated.…