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Focus Group Discussion (FGD)  with the Council of Chiefs and Elders of Kporghor Community
14 Dec
Published in Reports

Focus Group Discussion (FGD) with the Council of Chiefs and Elders of Kporghor Community

 

Isabelle Gilles, Human/Women's Rights consultant facilitating Focus Group Discussion (FGD) with the Council of Chiefs and Elders of Kporghor Community during the Integrated Baseline Study of Ogoni Cleanup.The consultant was engaged by to lead the research.

12 Dec
Published in Reports

Community perceptions of the Ogoni Clean-up Project Report

Community perceptions of the Ogoni Clean-up Project Report
 
Oil pollution is widespread in the Niger Delta and is caused by a combination of poor maintenance, corrosion, faulty equipment, failed clean-up attempts, ‘bunkering’ (i.e. large-scale illegal tapping of oil from pipelines) as well as ‘artisanal refining’ (i.e. small-scale, illegal refining of oil). In June 2016, the Federal Government of Nigeria officially launched the Ogoni clean-up process to implement the recommendations of a detailed environmental assessment by the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) published in 2011, to restore livelihood and the environment.
 
Subsequently, in 2017, the Government established and mandated the Hydrocarbon Pollution Remediation Project (HYPREP) to oversee the clean-up process. The Centre for Environment, Human Rights and Development (CEHRD) sought to understand the perceptions of Ogoni communities of the clean up process. Results therefrom would enable HYPREP adopts fit-for-purpose communication strategy that would contribute to achieving inclusive and violence free remediation. 
 
The research adopted focus group discussions, desk-based reviews, surveys and interviews to collect data from critical stakeholders including the locals, diplomats, members of State and Federal Parliament, Federal and State Ministries of Environment and Civil Society Organizations. The local communities are negative about their well-being, primarily because of oil pollution. Oil spill response system in Ogoniland is poor, while many stakeholders do not have an understanding of what the Ogoni clean-up exercise could deliver and what it could not.
 
In addition, Ogoni communities have a somewhat negative impression of the clean-up project so far, primarily because of the long delays and lack of tangible results in the still highly polluted areas. Nevertheless, there is significant optimism that the clean-up project could still operate smoothly and achieve its overall goal, but only if key drivers are sincere and committed. If there is effective women inclusion and livelihood capacity building, sufficient funding for the clean-up activities as well as inclusive and proactive communication and community participation in the actual clean-up activities.
 
Ogoni communities have high expectations of the clean-up project that go beyond the cleaning up of oil spills and environmental remediation. Recommendations include improved, inclusive bottom-up community engagement strategy, women and youths’ involvement in the clean-up project, conflict prevention and avoidance of re-pollution due to ‘bunkering’ (oil theft) and artisanal refining. The report elaborated some of the recommendations into concrete action plans, which are meant as inputs for continued dialogue between the various stakeholders in the Ogoni clean-up process.
 
You can download the report through the link below: 
 
DOWNLOAD LINK: http://cehrd.org.ng/research/communities_perceptions_of_the_ogoni_cleanup_project.pdf
12 Dec
Published in Publications

Adrift Fortunes: testimonies of women in oil polluted communities in the Niger Delta.

 Adrift fortunes: testimonies of women in oil polluted communities in the Niger Delta.
 
 
Oil pollution in the Niger Delta is widespread and its impact on the total environment is well documented. However, impact of oil pollution on women in the Niger Delta is grossly understudied and poorly documented. Yet, Women are more exposed to environmental changes because of a number of cultural and socio-economic factors such as keen dependence on natural resources, land right exclusion and patriarchal dominance in decision-making. They bear the burden of caring for families and depend mostly on the natural environment for livelihoods. The primary sources of livelihood of women in the Niger Delta include fishing, gathering of seafood, fuel wood and subsistence farming. These livelihood structures depend on endowment of the natural environment.  
 
The present research unravels how oil pollution from multiple sources, including artisanal refineries, impact on women in the region. It focused on selected communities in Bayelsa and Rivers States. The study used primary and secondary data. Primary data were obtained through questionnaires, Focus Group Discussion (FGD), Key Informant Interviews (KII) and site observations. Secondary data were generated from extant literature on impact of oil pollution on communities in the Niger Delta. Findings indicated women in the Niger Delta struggle daily to grapple with the effects of oil pollution, loss of livelihoods, battered reproductive health, heightening social vices, and erosion of their cultural heritage. The research proffered recommendations to broad spectrum of stakeholders, particularly the federal and state governments, international and indigenous oil companies and the local communities.

 

DOWNLOAD LINK TO THE REPORT BELOW:

https://cehrd.org.ng/images/MDR%20-%20Adrift%20Fortunes%20-%20Oil%20and%20%20%20Tears2.pdf 

CEHRD Press Release on World Environment Day 2018
05 Jun
Published in Reports

CEHRD Press Release on World Environment Day 2018

 

Act now to make Rivers State and the world free of plastic pollution!

 

 

With 13 million tonnes of plastic entering the ocean yearly, this year's world Environment Day tagged "Beat Plastic Pollution - if you can't reuse it, refuse it’’ is apt and timely for our local situation. Our creeks, rivers and the ocean are the major receptors of plastics. The Centre for Environment, Human Rights and Development (CEHRD) uses this opportunity to admonish the federal and state government to make waste management a top priority on their governance agenda, as we have no alternative.

CEHRD decries open dump and burning of plastics, which is a common practice in Nigeria. The local plastic waste management is rudimentary and uncoordinated. Our cities lack incinerators for plastic burning or reuse and recycle management regimes. In Nigeria, very little has been done to manage plastics!

CEHRD insists that there are low-tech, pro-people ways and schemes to curtail plastic waste. This could include but not limited to tax imposition' reduce, reuse and recycle culture, and regulatory bound amongst others.

The Rivers state Government's policy to take used tires off the streets is commendable. However, it is an incomplete approach. The Rivers State Government at the moment has no plastic recycling plant neither is it in partnership with one. Beside used tires, within Rivers state, there are different forms of plastic that serve different purposes. For example, there are plastic bags, bottles, pens, keg, and daily appliances amongst others that lace our streets, homes and public centres. As such, a holistic approach is necessary. There is need for a deliberate policy to comprehensively manage plastic in the State. For a start, the Rivers state waste Management Agency (RIWAMA) has a major role to play. First, massive enlightenment on the need to reduce plastic use, reuse plastic or recycle it. At the crude level, plastic reuse is practiced. For example, petty traders use plastic bottles to sell oil, local drinks, and for liquid storage. The plastic management life cycle currently ends partly at the reuse level because there is neither a policy nor mainstream education on the need to recycle. Worse still, there are no recycling Plants.

This should be followed by hands-on waste sorting education. This will only be sustainable if RIWAMA has plastic collection and recycling centres in the State. Receptacles should be provided at designated collection centres across the State including public places such as markets —not just in Port Harcourt. People should be educated on the benefits of waste sorting and recycling —to the environment, individuals and the State. While these sensitization and awareness creation is ongoing, the Rivers State House of Assembly has a role to develop legislation that will ensure effective and sustainable plastic management.

The Rivers State Government should, as a matter of urgency, initiate policies that will compel industries that package with plastics to embed end-of-life-cycle principle in their production processes —they should be concerned with the fate of their packaging plastic when it is disposed by the end user. Producers of bottle and sachet waters should provide compensatory schemes that would get the empty plastic bottles and sachets back to them. For example, if a deposit scheme rewards anyone who returns 100 empty water sachets with a bag or two bags of sachet water it will be hard to see useless sachet bags on our streets.

It is only when stringent actions as highlighted above are taken that we can contribute to global efforts to reduce the impacts of plastic  on our  oceans  and  general environment.  If we succeed in reduce plastic usage and reuse, the quantity of plastic that enters the ocean will be reduced. if we recycle our plastic, we will have no plastic entering the ocean. Ultimately, we would have collectively beaten plastic pollution; refreshed our ocean to produce more fishes and undertake ecosystem balance. These local efforts will have magnified global effects, while placing Rivers State in particular and Nigeria in general amongst global plastic environment sensitive areas.

 

As a responsive organization, CEHRD will continue to engage critical stakeholders to engender sustainable waste management in Nigeria.  For example, CEHRD has established and inaugurated environment clubs in selected schools across Rivers State.  Club members are taught and trained in appropriate waste disposal methods including plastics.  The environment is the mother of all rights including the right to life, and thus a battered environment is the abattoir of all rights

 

 

 

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A Peace Campaign/Sensitization Rally in Ogoniland in Gokana LGA
13 Nov
Published in Reports

A Peace Campaign/Sensitization Rally in Ogoniland in Gokana LGA

A Peace Campaign/Sensitization Rally in Ogoniland in Gokana LGA, to forestall any violence that may arise during the implementation of the clean-up. The project was funded by NACGOND.

Bodo City Girls Secondary School Environment Club in Gokana LGA,
13 Nov
Published in Reports

Bodo City Girls Secondary School Environment Club in Gokana LGA,

Bodo City Girls Secondary School Environment Club in Gokana LGA,  established by CEHRD with support from NACGOND; CEHRD congratulating the 1st prize winner in an essay competition organized for Environment Clubs in Government Secondary Schools, Port Harcourt by the Centre for Conflict and Gender Studies, University of Port Harcourt.

CEHRD trained citizen journalists attended the slum dwellers international West African summit held in Lagos, Nigeria
13 Nov
Published in Reports

CEHRD trained citizen journalists attended the slum dwellers international West African summit held in Lagos, Nigeria

In October 2017, CEHRD trained citizen journalists attended the slum dwellers international West African summit held in Lagos, Nigeria. The summit brought together people living in slum communities across Seven (7) countries in West Africa. At the summit, the trainees screened two (2) independent community videos to the participants of the summit, showing the challenges faced by the slum dwellers in Rivers State and how they have been using independent media in advocating and campaigning for the protection of their right to housing.

Environmental, Social, Health, Human Rights and Gender Impact Assessments (ESHR IA)
13 Nov
Published in Reports

Environmental, Social, Health, Human Rights and Gender Impact Assessments (ESHR IA)

A cross section of participants at a training organised by CEHRD for oil impacted communities from Eleme LGA on Environmental, Social, Health, Human Rights and Gender Impact Assessments (ESHR IA) funded by CORDAID.